Photographer: Henri Cartier-Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson (August 22, 1908 – August 3, 2004) was a French photographer considered to be the father of modern photojournalism. He was an early adopter of 35 mm  format, and the master of candid photography. He helped develop the street photographer style that was coined The Decisive Moment that has influenced generations of photographer.

Cartier-Bresson spent more than three decades on assignment for Life and other journals. He traveled without bounds, documenting some of the great upheavals of the 20th century — the Spanish civil war, the liberation of Paris in 1944, the 1968 student rebellion in Paris, the fall of the Kuomintang in China to the communists, the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi, the Berlin Wall, and the deserts of Egypt. He became the first Western photographer to photograph “freely” in the post-war Soviet Union. But many of his most renowned photographs are of ordinary daily life, seemingly unimportant moments captured and then gone.

Cartier-Bresson died on August 3, 2004, aged 95. No cause of death was announced. He was buried in the local cemetery.

Henri_Cartier_Bresson_1

France

France

Brussels

Brussels

Picasso and daughter - Spain

Picasso and daughter – Spain

Rome

Rome

Mexico

Mexico

France

France

USA (somewhere)

USA (somewhere)

Rome

Rome

France - The River Marne

France – The River Marne

Seville, Spain

Seville, Spain

Truman Capote - USA

Truman Capote – USA

PAris

France

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

France

France

Henri Cartier-Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson

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Posted on June 7, 2013, in Photography and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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